Getting them dry at night

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Luckyducky
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Posted: Sat Nov 03, 2012 11:08 pm 
Post subject: Getting them dry at night
Hi, my daughter was 4 in June and was still in pull ups at night. We got to the point where the pull ups were still dry in the morning about 90% of the time so we decided this week, as it is half term, to try without pull-ups, which she was very excited about. It has been a disaster!!! We have had to wash her bedding about 5 times as she's wet the bed and have only had a couple of dry nights, compared to 5 or 6 nights a week when she was in pull-ups. We've tried getting her up when we go to bed to go to the toilet, but one night she just wouldn't do anything when we took her and tonight she'd already wet the bed when we went in. She's such a deep sleeper that she's not even waking up when she does wet the bed, just sleeps through in wet clothes.

I don't know what to do. I think she'll feel really downhearted if we put her back in pull-ups, like she's failed. But I can't be washing the sheets every morning or have her sleeping in a wet bed every night.

Anyone got any suggestions, don't know how to handle this one and how to get her dry at night.
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keltru
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Posted: Sun Nov 04, 2012 8:41 am 
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Sorry I can't really offer much advice on this one but didn't want to read and run. Emilia was dry at night pretty much as soon as she was dry in the day but we used pull-ups for a while and she used to look at the pictures every morning to tell me whether it was a dry morning or not. To be honest you're probably best to just keep on with the pull-ups for a bit as I think there's a connection in the brain that has to happen before kids to dry at night and some are just later than others. That's why boys can be quite old sometimes before they are dry at night as this connection can take longer in them. It must be a common problem as they sell loads of pyjama pull-up pants in the supermarket. As long as you explain to her that she's not the only one then she shouldn't feel too bad x x x
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keltru
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Posted: Sun Nov 04, 2012 8:45 am 
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There's some info on bed-wetting on the nhs choices website, from what it said it could just be that she's such a deep-sleeper that the signal from her brain to bladder is not strong enough to wake her at night x x
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DL05
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Posted: Sun Nov 04, 2012 10:13 am 
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I've had this problem with my oldest and youngest daughters, they were dry during the day from 2 and a few months but my oldest was 13 before she stopped bed wetting and my youngest will be 13 in december and still occassionally wets, just because they're both incredidibly deep sleepers, they also wouldn't even wake when wet , my youngest was in pull ups for a long time and up until last year if we went away in our caravan or she went on a sleep over or trip she had to wear them just in case Confused
I also tried everything I could think of over the years,waking them to go to the loo etc. my oldest would sleep walk there ,pee and still wet the bed later Rolling Eyes star charts ,all sorts of stuff and none of it worked with these two , the thing that finally did it with my oldest was moving to germany then moving house again 3 weeks later ,
I think it was having quite a few nights of not sleeping so deeply in new surroundings that did the trick and maybe helped her brain make that connection Question (totally impractical as a method to get them to stop though Rolling Eyes )
and as I say I've still not found a solution for my youngest Question , the GP with my oldest suggested a steroid spray Question which i was reluctant at first to try and then when I did ask my new GP about it he said the NHS don't use it now , my older sis (its been a bit of a family issue Rolling Eyes Laughing )had a mattress alarm that went off when it sensed moisture , woke everyone else up but her though Rolling Eyes the idea is even if it doesn't stop the wetting to begin with that being woken helps them make the connection with weeing and waking up Question
You can still buy them , but as my daughters don't wake up with alarms anyway I didn't try it,plus a little bit of me thinks its a bit mean Embarassed Laughing , it didn't work for my sis either she finally grew out of it at 14 , but they do work for some kids Question
If you don't mind using the pull ups though I'd ask her how she feels about carrying on with them ? She might not be bothered and at least she won't be getting disturbed by you having to wake her to change the bed Question
If she's not happy to go back to them though you can get the bed mats ? The best place to look is incontinence suppliers for adults as they have some heavy duty mattress protection and bed mats which are much bigger and cheaper than the ones the supermarkets stock, they also do washable ones :)and they do the best plastic matrees protectors including total enclosure ones which are around £30 to £35 ,pricier than the kiddie ones but much better and more robust and a lot cheaper than replacing a mattress Smile
Its really common though and a lot of people won't admit that their children still bed wet, no idea why as its not like they can control it Question I'm sure any child given the choice would be dry but sometimes it just takes longer to get there Smile
I think GP's only see it as a problem once they get to 7 ish as it is so common before that age so there's a good chance she'll just grow out of it in the next year or two Smile xx
mpat
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Posted: Tue Nov 06, 2012 8:58 pm 
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We have just in the past few weeks gone throught this. My daughter is just over 3 and has been dry during the day for about a year now. We decided tht we should remove her pull ups at night as, like you, she was dry some of the time and she was keen to stop wearing them. We wanted her to be enthusiastic about it. So I made a big deal of it and we laid the pull ups (she calls them fairy pants) on the kitchen table at bedtime. I told my daughter that the fairies were going to cme and take them away since she was such a big girl now and they were going to give them to another little girl. In the morning, the pull ups had gone and the 'fairies' had left a note saying they were proud plus a wee sweetie reward and some confetti fairy dust!!! My wee one was elighted!
We had to wash the sheets a fair bit the first week. Initially I said it's okay, we will try again tonight. She didnt like being wet so hoped that would encourage her to stay dry but liek your wee one, she is a very deep sleeper.
In the end, I made a big thing of it at night, making sure she peed before bed and reminding her before she went to sleep. I just had to hope that we would have 1 good night, which we did and so she got loads of praise and was very proud of herself!
If she wet the bed anytime after that I was very calm and understanding but had a slightly firmer tone (not cross at all, just more of a 'I know you can do it')
She has now gpne about a week and a half without wetting. Dont get me wrong, I expect there will be more accidents at points but for me the key things were to not let her have any juice about an hour and half before bed and giving her lots of encouragement (the fairies helped with that!!!)
I hope taht helps???? I think you are right to keep trying even thoug it hasnt gone well so far. It only takes 1 good night for them to realise what they need to do so I hope that happens soon!!!
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